Father Kevin’s Reflection – Easter Sunday

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At the beginning of Lent, I was switching between radio stations and hit the song “Love Without End, Amen” by Aaron Gale Barker…made popular by the country singer George Strait. If you haven’t heard it recently, do a search and find it. Baker (and Strait) gets the Season we now have and will celebrate (and he has a great melody stream too).

Love is the most powerful force in the world and  in our lives. In spite of the violence, injustice and pain we inflict upon each other as human beings and in spite of  the devastating power of weapons we have developed to protect and defend ourselves, no power other than love will bring peace and unity. Once Jesus was arrested, He was no longer the one doing things for other people, people were doing things to Him. The Scripture passages that recount His Passion do not focus so much on the physical brutality He experienced with the scourging at the pillar, the crowning with thorns, or the extremely painful act of crucifixion. The Scriptures speak about the betrayal, denial, abandonment, and injustice. Through it all Jesus remains silent and passive. There are no words of rebuke, no threats from His mouth, no expressions of disappointment, and no words that would in any way say He was giving up on us. Jesus suffered in silence, but the love in His heart was not extinguished, compromised, or denied. As we saw on Good Friday, His words on the cross expressed only love: “Father, forgive them, they know not what they do.” “This day you will be with me in paradise.” “Son, there is your mother, mother, there is your son.” Jesus not only died for us and our sins, He rose to give us a share in the new life of Easter.

The older we get, the harder it is to trust and the easier it is to become skeptical and cynical. Yet none of us wants to be this way. Something inside us wants to trust, to hope, to believe in the goodness of things, to again feel that trustful enthusiasm we once had as children, when we were innocent (and innocent means “unwounded”), and we could still take another’s hand in trust. No one wants to be outside the circle of trust. The Resurrection makes real this desire we all have in the depths of our hearts.

When Jesus rose, He told his disciples to go back to Galilee. Galilee was a geographical place, but even more it was the place where His disciples first came to believe in Him. Jesus was calling them back to their initial innocence, joy, and trust in His love for them. To return to the idealisms that first drew themselves to Jesus. The Resurrection was far more than the body of Jesus coming back from the dead. It was the final, emphatic proclamation and reality of the powerful depth of His love. It was that love that renewed His first followers as they laid the foundation of Church, the Body of Christ in the world. We are now the living members of the Body of Christ in the world today. Easter is our time to be renewed by the powerful hope that love is more powerful than evil. Hope is more powerful than apathy or despair, and faith is more powerful than distrust. As you come to Church this Easter Sunday, welcome to Galilee! Welcome home, where once again we are told by God…I love you! May that love permeate our minds and hearts in all we do each day! There is no greater love and it is God’s gift to us – without end … Amen.

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