Faith

Father Kevin’s Reflection – June 25, 2017

Posted on

One of the gifts we have as Catholics is the living Word of God. The first part of every Mass we celebrate is called the Liturgy of the Word. The Word, of course, comes to us from the Bible, the inspired Word of God. The Bible is far more than a historical account of the relationship of God and His people, it is the life-giving voice of God for us to hear, think about, and be informed, encouraged, and inspired by as we hear this week’s Sunday readings.

More than 3,000 years ago there were two women who were ordered to kill male children when they were born, but they refused. Their names are Shiphrah and Puah, and their goodness and concern for human life is recorded in the first chapter of the Book of Exodus. The Jewish people wound up in Egypt after Joseph was sold into slavery and then became a very high-ranking person in the royal family. But once Joseph died and time passed, the Jewish people were enslaved and the birth of their male children was seen as a threat to the King and his fellow Egyptians. Exodus 1:15-22 tells us: “The King of Egypt told the Hebrew midwives, one of whom was called Shiphrah and the other Puah, “When you act as midwives for the Hebrew women, look on the birthstool: if it is a boy, kill him; but if it is a girl, she may live.” The midwives, however, feared God; they did not do as the King of Egypt had ordered them, but let the boys live. So the king of Egypt summoned the midwives and asked them, “Why have you done this, allowing the boys to live?” The midwives answered Pharaoh, “The Hebrew women are not like the Egyptian women. They are robust and give birth before the midwife arrives.” Therefore God dealt well with the midwives; and the people multiplied and grew very numerous. And because the midwives feared God, God built up families for them. Pharaoh then commanded all his people, “Throw into the Nile every boy that is born, but you may let all the girls live.”

These two midwives are our forebears in the Pro-life movement today. They refused to be threatened by what the King would do to them, and as a result, found peace with God and experienced His blessing. They saw beyond popular opinion and the law enacted by the leader of their nation.

This week’s reflection is brought forward to remind our parish members that the Fortnight of Freedom (which was established since the Obama administration attempts…(and I remind everyone…still attempts)…to remove religious freedoms from our public square. Too many believe that the Trump administration “has taken care of all that”. NOT TRUE…the Obama leftovers continue his agenda in full force and by every means possible. So let us not be lulled into a sense of false security. The Fortnight for Freedom of 2017 has begun last Wednesday, June 21st (the vigil of the Feasts of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More) to July 4th (Independence Day). This is a time to pray all the more for our country. The US Conference of Bishops asks us to reflect:

It is good to love one’s country, but ultimate loyalty is due only to Christ and his kingdom. Nationalism becomes idolatrous when loyalty to the nation is more important than loyalty to Christ.  Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher show us what faithful citizenship looks like.  They loved and served their country. But when they were forced to choose between God’s Church and the king, they were faithful to the Church. May their example continue to illuminate the path for us, as we seek to faithfully serve our Church and country.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – June 4, 2017

Posted on Updated on

In today’s Gospel Jesus is speaking from the same place He was for the Last Supper. In this passage Jesus is giving us His last will and testament. What is He going to leave to His followers? His love. That love includes not only Himself, but the Father and Holy Spirit. He fulfills His Last Supper promise: “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.” (John 14: 15-16) Jesus did die on the cross, but He did not leave us. As we see in His words He will come and dwell within us and the Father will come with Him. A few verses later Jesus promises to send us the Holy Spirit. Our inheritance from Him is the fullness of the life of God. We began that life the moment we were baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. (We remind ourselves of this treasure every time we bless ourselves in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.)

When you think about it, those we love do dwell within us. They are an intimate and intricate part of who we are. They are always in our hearts that are filled with love for them expressed in our concern, goodness, gratitude, humility, sacrifices, mercy, and generosity. In this Gospel passage Jesus expressed what was going to happen when He died and rose from the dead. Our inheritance from Him is the gift of Himself, the Father, and Holy Spirit dwelling within us. How does this inheritance affect our lives? The more we “use” our inheritance from Jesus, the more we recognize the gift of peace that He also promises in today’s Gospel: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you.” This is the peace we long for as individuals, families, communities, nations, and worldwide. Human efforts have helped us to defeat the countless powers that seek to separate us from God and one another (just ask a faith-filled veteran). Yet still, in all too many places around the world, there is violence, injustice, destruction and the abuse and taking of human life.

So, what is this peace Jesus is leaving us? It is the peace that comes from truly believing that He knows us as we are at each moment of our lives and is with us in all we say, do and think each day. This thought is expressed so clearly at the beginning of each of the four Eucharistic Prayers (for Various Occasions): “You are indeed Holy and to be glorified, O God, Who love the human race and Who always walk with us on the journey of life. Blessed indeed is Your Son, present in our midst when we are gathered by His Love, and when, as once for the disciples, so now for us, He opens the Scriptures and breaks the bread.” Obviously we need to accept His invitation to be renewed by our inheritance from Him through our heartfelt participation in the Mass every week. Jesus never tires of inviting us to open our eyes to His Love for us and His Presence to us. It is Jesus and our inheritance from Him, which is Jesus Himself, that lifts us beyond the confusion, challenges, and obstacles we face as individuals, families, communities, and nations. Only a nation under God can be one nation. It takes God to not only take away the confusion…but also to enlighten us with the truth of who we truly are and what we are ultimately capable of in the best sense possible.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 28, 2017

Posted on Updated on

Those who are an intimate part of our lives dwell in our minds and hearts. They color the way we live our lives every day. When they are sick and suffering they are in the forefront of our thoughts and concerns. Their burdens become our burden. When they are celebrating achievements or special events, we are joyful with them and for them. When they are confused we look to help work out their problems and concerns and at the same time assure them of our love. It is exactly this kind of presence that Jesus promises to us in today’s Gospel when He promises to bring the Father and dwell within us. Are we aware of this presence? Do we want this presence? 

During the Easter Season almost every day the first reading at Mass has been from the Acts of the Apostles. This book of the Bible is the account of the first generation of the Church after Jesus rose and ascended into heaven. They faced many challenges among themselves and from outside forces. What is very clear as we read from the Acts of the Apostles is that all who came to believe in Jesus knew that He was dwelling within them and they were dwelling within Him. One very clear example is from Acts 5:17-29: 

“Then the high priest rose up and all his companions, that is, the party of the Sadducees, and, filled with jealousy, laid hands upon the apostles and put them in the public jail. But during the night, the angel of the Lord opened the doors of the prison, led them out, and said, ‘Go and take your place in the temple area, and tell the people everything about this life.’ When they heard this, they went to the temple early in the morning and taught. When the high priest and his companions arrived, they convened the Sanhedrin, the full senate of the Israelites, and sent to the jail to have them brought in. But the court officers who went did not find them in the prison, so they came back and reported, ‘We found the jail securely locked and the guards stationed outside the doors, but when we opened them, we found no one inside.’ When they heard this report, the captain of the temple guard and the chief priests were at a loss about them, as to what this would come to. Then someone came in and reported to them, ‘The men whom you put in prison are in the temple area and are teaching the people.’ Then the captain and the court officers went and brought them in, but without force, because they were afraid of being stoned by the people. When they had brought them in and made them stand before the Sanhedrin, the high priest questioned them, ‘We gave you strict orders [did we not?] to stop teaching in that name. Yet you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching and want to bring this man’s blood upon us.’ But Peter and the apostles said in reply, ‘We must obey God rather than men.’ 

With a little time, the Apostles (and us) can finally figured it out…the need for God in our lives. And, not a god we make up out of our own minds…but…God, Who wants us to have a real…intimate…actual relationship with us (but on His terms…not ours). Our challenge as American Catholics is not to be so influenced by the media, political candidates, and political parties…but to allow the vision of Jesus who dwells within us to illumine the way to the truth for ourselves and for our nation. Our society over and over again dismisses God and sound moral doctrine in the name of convenience and freedom. To be part of that mind set is to walk down the path with your head looking straight up and not where your feet are going. Of course any path like this leads to confusion and destruction (and misleads our young people about what it means to dwell in: Jesus…the Father…or to recognize Jesus and the Father dwelling in us). Take a hint from the Gospel and the angel in Acts this week: “Why are you standing there looking at the sky?” Get busy as Jesus told you: “All power in heaven and on earth has been given to Me. Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 21, 2017

Posted on

Last week we celebrated Mother’s Day. As we honored one parent lst week, Jesus honors His Father this week. In today’s Gospel Jesus speaks about how He is going to glorify God. That glorification is seen in how He suffered the injustice of crucifixion, but rose from the dead and beyond all who tried to silence Him. He spoke (and taught) something that in the 21st century…is absolutely, politically incorrect. Saying – do what I tell you and you will be assured of being correct, and you will find an eternity of happiness. He said: “I am the way the truth and the life”. Well…who does Jesus think He is? After all…is Pontius Pilate more the model of the 21st century…when – looking at Jesus…do we say: “What is truth?” In looking at what is going on in our nation at this point and all the debates about different issues, respect for life must be at the forefront. Whenever we compromise or deny the truth, the seeds of destruction and disunity are planted. We who have the treasure of faith are not obliged to convert those who are not in agreement with us…but we are challenged to speak up for the truth about human life. There is no candidate that is perfect on this issue as far as action is concerned. Some Catholic politicians at least pay lip service…while others are clearly supportive of abortion.  I am not a one issue person, but when a basic issue is ignored there will never be peace in our hearts, our nation, and in our world. To look past the issue of abortion is to allow evil to continue to destroy children in the womb and scar the hearts, minds, and souls of all those involved. How could the German people stand by and allow 12 million people to perish in the concentration camps? How can we continue to stand by as almost 60 million children have been aborted since this practice was legalized on January 22, 1973? Evil has wreaked havoc for the past 43 years. How much longer will it prosper? Who will speak up? Politicians promise jobs, reform, lower taxes, refugee programs, and the defeat of ISIS and other evils. (They speak as if they are an omnipotent God.) But wherever innocent life is attacked or threatened and nothing is done, our national spirit deteriorates.

We are grateful to all veterans who have sacrificed their time and even their lives to defend who we are as Americans. Easter time energizes us to muster the courage to look at what is most important to our nation.   When we glorify God by our lives as Jesus did, our national health and moral fiber are strengthened.

The Resurrection of Jesus has many aspects. One of them is rising above our fears, hesitancy, lethargy, apathy, and ignorance to live and speak the truth about human life. Life is a gift from God. You who are parents have blessed your children in the God-like way you created them and continue to love and nurture them.  You are more fully alive with them than you would have been without them.

As Jesus is the Way, the Truth and the life…let us say:  Thank you Father for the gift of life. Thank you for the gift of your Son Jesus. May my gratitude inspire and sustain me in doing everything I can to respect all people and to do all in my power to end abortion and everything else that harms, abuses, or threatens human life. Give me the courage and strength to live in your image each day.

Henri Nouwen said: “Prayer is the way to both the heart of God and the heart of the world.”How blessed, challenged, grateful, and humbled we are to live in God’s world.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 14, 2017

Posted on

Many know that I was assigned to St. Sebastian Church back in Connecticut when I was a deacon. It was a predominately Italian parish. (And, yes there is a difference.) I would visit and bring Communion to an elderly Italian lady who lived to be 102 years old. Every time I visited her one of the first questions out of her mouth with her heavy Italian accent was: “How’s your mother?” That was quickly followed by these words from her: “Nobody loves you like your mother!” Today we celebrate Mother’s Day. It is a special day to do what we actually do each time we see or think about our mothers – to give thanks for the life they have given us and their continued maternal love. Whether we are children or adults, whether our mothers are living or deceased…we have the gift of life because they carried us in their wombs and nurtured us as children.

There is another Mother I honor every day as well – Mary. As He was dying on the cross Jesus said to St. John and to all of us: “Son there is your mother.” Jesus knew the love of His Mother. She conceived Him miraculously in her womb through the power of the Holy Spirit. As she anxiously searched for a place to give Him birth which we know was a stable, she had the joy of seeing the wonder and awe of the shepherds who responded to the announcement to them by the angels and went and saw the newborn Christ Child. What wonder she must have felt when the Magi came, who prostrated themselves in gratitude, and offered their gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. Forty days after His birth, she and St. Joseph presented Him in the temple. There she heard the heartfelt words of the old man Simeon, who recognized the gift of God Himself in the child Jesus. He also foretold the sorrow His Mother Mary would experience when he said: “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” (Luke 2:34-35) Like every mother, Mary knew the joy of her Son’s goodness and love for herself and others. She also knew the pain when He was rejected.  But her love for her Son did not make her bitter, angry, or doubtful when others attacked, betrayed, or abandoned Him.  Just as she trusted that she would conceive Jesus in her womb by the power of the Holy Spirit, so she stood at the foot of the cross with hope and trust in God.

We also have the blessing of belonging to and being part of Holy Mother Church. As Catholics we are a living, life-giving part of the Body of Christ on earth. Once we receive life from the Church we make the Church a powerful source of love, hope, healing, and assistance as individuals and as a community of believers. On a local level in the parish, most are fed weekly by God’s Word and Presence at Mass. (Some are able to be nurtured at our daily Masses.) When we fail because of human weakness and sinfulness, we are renewed, refreshed, and forgiven in the Sacrament of Penance. People who are sick or going into the hospital for surgery or other medical procedures are anointed with the oil where Jesus and His healing presence are encountered in the Sacrament of the Sick.   We celebrate weddings, joining couples together in a bond of love that mirrors Jesus’ love for the Church. At funerals where we come together in sadness, compassion, love, and hope to pray for those who have died and to pray for and with their families and friends. We educate our children in the religious education programs. The Treasure Hut in Hoven reaches out to so many people who have a great number of different needs. Yes, Holy Mother Church is a powerful source for nourishment to thousands of people because together we are a Parish Family.

I wish all mothers a Happy Mother’s Day. May God bless you for the life, love and goodness you have so generously showered upon us. Along with the Blessed Virgin Mary…you are signs and sources that encourage all of us to be good, loving, generous, life-giving members of Holy Mother Church.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 7, 2017

Posted on

Jesus knows us better than we know ourselves. We see this in this week’s Gospel. His disciples taking His words to heart in the Our Father each day gives us a spiritual reminder and uplift of all we are entrusted to do as the followers of Jesus and all we are truly capable of. By praying the Hail Mary we acknowledge Mary’s powerful faith and her love for Jesus and us. In our imperfection but faith fired hope we say: “Pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.” Like any mother she sees beyond our faults and imperfections to someone she loves with all her heart.

We also hear the voice of Jesus speaking to us through our consciences. At times we ponder what we should say or do. Openness to the Spirit of God enables us to hear the voice of Jesus and say or do what He would say or do. When someone tells us of a good thing that has happened to another person we know, we increase their joy with words of congratulations. When we thank people for what they have done for us, we increase their joy. At times we are told of those who are sick or mourning the loss of a loved one. Those words lead us to visit them and offer them words of comfort and love.

Each day is another opportunity to hear God’s voice in all the ways we use to communicate with one another. The more we listen, the more we respond with our life-giving presence and words. The constant blessing is not only our life-giving words to others, but the chance to speak them from our hearts. Life-giving words are Resurrection words – they lift us both those who hear them and those speak them.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – April 30, 2017

Posted on Updated on

One of the joys of being a priest is baptizing children. Before the ceremony begins, there is a lot of joy and enthusiasm in all who are present. How good it is to see how an innocent child, who is need of constant care and attention, brings such unity and joy. Along with their parents, who among us would not do anything to help these innocent souls to be healthy, happy, and cared for? The birth of a child is a Resurrection experience in that it raises the lives of parents especially to a new level of love. Sleepless nights and concern for any problems are sacrifices readily made for the good of a child. Newborn children along with anyone else we let into the depths of our minds and hearts raise us to a level in our lives that is energizing, encouraging, and inspiring.

Does our presence bring love, life, and mercy to others? When it does that is the power of the Resurrection in our minds and hearts. To bring love, life, and mercy to others means we do far more than avoid evils the Ten Commandments warn us against. Virtue and the love of God are far more than being able to say, “I didn’t kill anyone,” or “I didn’t commit adultery.”  Virtue, living in union with the Risen Christ, and being part of His life means I do far more than avoid draining life out of others and myself through my words and actions. It means giving life by my thoughts, words, and actions at all times, in all places. It means far more than avoiding unfaithfulness to God and others; it means always being there, loving with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength.

The Resurrection is far more than rising from the dead and evil and its consequences; it means living in Jesus and allowing Him to live in us. Our loved ones live in us and we live in them. Even our loved ones who have died are still very much a part of who we are. We are grateful for them and their love and goodness. As we see in today’s Gospel, the disciples were very much alive in the mind and heart of Jesus.  In Jesus they and we are far more than grateful for His love and goodness, we become His love, mercy, and goodness.

When we are born we are embraced by the love, gratitude, and joy of our parents. We are raised to ultimate hope and joy in life when we see how we are embraced by the love, life, and mercy of God in Jesus.  When we embrace the pure love, life, and mercy of God we become that very love, life, and mercy.