Reflections

Father Kevin’s Reflection – July 9, 2017

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Both this and last week’s Gospels can cause a person to think about Jesus as CS Lewis had. Jesus (when it comes right down to it) was one of three realities: He was insane. He was a liar. He is what He said He was…the Son of God. (“You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon, or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and God…but let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about His being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.” from Mere Christianity)

One of the insights we all grapple with is that we are not in control of so many things in our personal lives, in the lives of those we love, and in the lives of our country and our world. Peace only comes when we rise above the frustration, disappointment, anger, and vengeful thoughts that fill our minds when things do not work out the way we think they should. I have been reading a book quoting Henri Nouwen who had this profound thought: “Keep your eyes fixed on the Prince of Peace, Who doesn’t cling to His Divine Power, Who refuses to turn stones into bread, jump from great heights, and rule with great power. See the One Who touches the lame, the crippled, and the blind; Who speaks words of forgiveness and encouragement; Who dies alone, rejected and despised. Keep your eyes on Him Who becomes poor with the poor, weak with the weak…and Who is rejected with the rejected. That one, Jesus, is the source of all peace.” Was Jesus able to find peace in this world and, even more bring peace into our world? Of course He found peace, the peace that came from the prevailing thread revealed throughout the Old Testament Scriptures and the four Gospels – God never takes no for an answer. God never gives up on us. God never stops reaching out to us. His love is divine, merciful, unconditional, and life giving. Jesus experienced rejection in the form of not being welcomed from the first moment He came forth from Mary’s womb (you know…there was no room for them at the inn). After bringing joy to the shepherds in the area who responded to the angel’s announcement about Jesus’ birth, and to the Magi with their humble, grateful gifts…Joseph had to take Mary and Jesus and flee to Egypt to escape King Herod’s attempt to kill Jesus. Rejection that caused Him to be a refugee did not stop Him from coming back to God’s chosen people…His people…the Jews.

When I conclude my morning prayers, I like to reflect on the paradox of the Jesus Christ that Lewis presented…he is great in giving me the hope, inspiration, and the foundation to rise above frustration, disappointment, anger, and vengeful thoughts as I start the day. (Sure, at times I do not always succeed…but the lack of success or right judgment are lessened and the next day I once again have hope.) After praying morning prayer in the breviary, I read the Paradoxical Commands that come from a book by Kent Keith entitled “Anyway.” (St. [Mother] Teresa of Calcutta had these hanging in an office she used.) I read them thinking about how Jesus lived them. The Paradoxical Commands are a good guide that will help us find the peace Jesus came to bring into our daily lives, a good guide to commit ourselves as we leave the Easter Season (and think of the lessons of this week’s Gospel). The Paradoxical Commands:

People are unreasonable, illogical and

self-centered. Love them anyway. 

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish

and ulterior motives. Do good anyway. 

If you are successful, you will win false friends and

true enemies. Succeed anyway. 

The good you do will be forgotten tomorrow.

Do good anyway. 

Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable. Be

honest and frank anyway. 

What you spend years building may be

 destroyed overnight. Build anyway. 

People really need help. They may attack you if

you help them. Help people anyway. 

Give the world the best you have and you may be

repaid with indifference. Give the world the

best you can anyway.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – July 2, 2017

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As the Fortnight of Freedom 2017 comes to a close, as a nation of faithful Catholics and Christians, we continue our prayers for our United States. There are so many who are confused and misguided with the lies of “choice” and “conscience”.

Reflect, if you will on the story of Norma McCorvey. A woman who no one knows by name. She is the woman who is Roe in the Supreme Court case of Roe vs. Wade (the case that made abortion legal in our nation on January 22, 1973). Her road to notoriety started with an unplanned pregnancy. She originally said she was raped, a factor she thought would strengthen her case. Her lawyer was a pro-abortion feminist. It is interesting and encouraging to see how the life of Norma McCorvey has played out.

First of all, Norma never had an abortion. The child in her womb was too far formed. When she asked her doctor for an adoptive/foster attorney, that attorney put her in touch with the pro-abortion lawyer. Ironically, Norma McCorvey never stepped foot in a courtroom. She had signed an affidavit in Texas and was used as a pawn. (So much for “women’s’ rights”) She read about the legalization of abortion in the newspaper and was never contacted after the signing.

In 1995 Norma McCorvey declared herself Pro-life. In an account of a banquet of citizens for life that met in Alabama there was this observation: “In a 1995 Nightline interview, she explained that after working in four Dallas area abortion centers and learning a lot more, she started having inner-conflicts with herself. From that time on, Norma has completely moved her position from “a woman’s right to choose…to…upholding the right to life of the preborn baby.”

In the end people of good will see the light. Now is our challenge and time to witness to the truth of human life in the womb. I encourage you to say the prayer I put at the end of last week’s column (inspired from this week’s first reading): “Thank You Father for the gift of life.  Thank You for the gift of Your Son Jesus. May my gratitude inspire and sustain me in doing everything I can to respect the lives of all people and to do all in my power to end abortion…and everything else that harms, abuses, or threatens human life. Give me the courage and strength to live in Your image each day. Amen.”

Psalm 69 has simple words to contemplate (the Psalm verses from last week): For Your sake I bear insult, and shame covers my face. I have become an outcast to my brothers, a stranger to my children, because zeal for Your house consumes me, and the insults of those who blaspheme You fall upon me. I pray to You, O LORD, for the time of Your favor, O God!

In Your great kindness answer me with Your constant help. Answer me, O LORD, for bounteous is Your kindness; in Your Great Mercy turn toward me. “See, you lowly ones, and be glad; you who seek God, may your hearts revive! For the LORD hears the poor, and His own who are in bonds He spurns not. Let the heavens and the earth praise Him, the seas and whatever moves in them!”

Father Kevin’s Reflection – June 18, 2017

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This week, the Church…Universal…takes a moment in celebration and contemplation of the Mystery found in the Most Holy Sacrament…The Body and Blood of Christ. Again…celebration…fellowship…appreciation of us being called not only to be brothers and sisters of Jesus Christ; but, being made one with Him (Mysteriously) in His Body and Blood…if we allow the Miracle to engulf us.

This week, too, begins the Fortnight of Freedom 2017.   We recognize as the Bride of Christ, our need to bring about God’s love and His kingdom on earth…as it is in Heaven.

The people of Jesus’ time were restless and fearful because their nation was occupied by the Romans (who were very brutal at times…just look at a crucifix we have hanging in our homes and work places). They lived with the tension of being faithful to who they were as the people of God and how the Roman governors treated them. In the case of Jesus’ crucifixion some of the religious leaders used the hated Roman law to remove Jesus, a fellow citizen, from the face of the earth. They were blind to the Author and Presence of all truth, God’s Truth. The truth is that we need God and His loving presence, mercy, and Spirit in Jesus. If we take Jesus and the power of His love seriously we have more inner strength to be loving, forgiving, humble and grateful for the blessing of someone as close as a spouse in marriage. Jesus wants what we want – a happy, joyful, life-long relationship of life giving love. As much as we are self sufficient and self-giving, we will find no greater inner peace and purpose than we do in Jesus and His truth that sets us free. His is the freedom that enables us to give without counting the cost…to look beyond petty differences to deepen love…to forgive from the heart so as not to remind the one who hurt us over and over again about how wrong he or she was.

It is the peace of His truth that gives us the desire to apologize for the pain and hurt we have caused. How important it is to live what we pray in the Our Father, “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.” That is extremely difficult without our daily bread, especially the Bread of Life in the Eucharist every week.

It is the truth of Jesus that gives us the wisdom to see where we need to speak out against injustice and speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves. Truth not acknowledged…unleashes evil. Truth ignored…expands evil’s reach. Evil unchallenged…contradicts the peace, hope and unity only the truth can make a reality. The Fortnight of Freedom reminds us: once one life is expendable…more freedoms and lives become expendable. Comfort, pleasure and irresponsibility replace sacrifice, generosity and justice. Those who speak truth against the evils of the world are portrayed as the ones who unjustly deprive others of their freedom to choose. Freedom to do evil has divided us and seeks to silence the voice of Truth. There are many Pilates in our nation who echo his question: Truth, what is that? That is followed by the blasé attitude of: Who really cares anyway?

The voice of Jesus calls us to care. Why us? We are the ones He loves and trusts. We are the ones He speaks the truth from His Heart to. How good it is when we have the courage to live it not only for ourselves, but for the good of our nation. And, before I forget: Thanks to all our fathers…those who naturally (often in silence) witness the love of the Father.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – June 11, 2017

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Next week, we as a society honor the fathers who do so much (and like St. Joseph, himself) are given little fanfare. This year, in your celebrations, remember the new fathers that are not so well known to many: Father Joseph Scholten, Father Brian Eckrich, Father Andrew Thuringer, Father Tyler Mattson, Father Timothy Smith and Father Thomas Hartman (and Father … to be…God willing…Rev. Mr. Patrick Grode). Let us take a moment this week to prepare for next Sunday’s celebrations! Let’s not just think about our fathers for just one moment for one day this year.

Yes…we celebrate the mystery of the Holy Trinity this week. But, often, we are overwhelmed by the the Three in One Godhead. So…something to reflect –

At the Masses this weekend we will offer a special blessing to our fathers, grandfathers, godfathers, and all who offer us paternal love and care. They protect us, provide for us and support us often in many unappreciated ways. It is sad that all too often their holy vocation is depicted so disparagingly in sit-coms, movies, etc. Far from being bumbling dolts…our fathers are so often a great source of thoughtful advice, lived experience and compassionate encouragement. They are often faithful, quiet examples of hard work and loving dedication. We are deeply grateful for them and we ask our Heavenly Father to bless them this day.

There is a hymn in the missalette that always makes me pause on the greatness of the vocation of father’s as we think of the father of Jesus – St. Joseph (often thought of as the “forgotten” saint): “… And Joesph’s love make ‘father’, To be, for Christ, God’s Name”. (ref: By All Your Saints Still Striving) May, God our Heavenly Father, keep all our fathers close and blessed as they reflect His (often unspoken) Love.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – June 4, 2017

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In today’s Gospel Jesus is speaking from the same place He was for the Last Supper. In this passage Jesus is giving us His last will and testament. What is He going to leave to His followers? His love. That love includes not only Himself, but the Father and Holy Spirit. He fulfills His Last Supper promise: “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.” (John 14: 15-16) Jesus did die on the cross, but He did not leave us. As we see in His words He will come and dwell within us and the Father will come with Him. A few verses later Jesus promises to send us the Holy Spirit. Our inheritance from Him is the fullness of the life of God. We began that life the moment we were baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. (We remind ourselves of this treasure every time we bless ourselves in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.)

When you think about it, those we love do dwell within us. They are an intimate and intricate part of who we are. They are always in our hearts that are filled with love for them expressed in our concern, goodness, gratitude, humility, sacrifices, mercy, and generosity. In this Gospel passage Jesus expressed what was going to happen when He died and rose from the dead. Our inheritance from Him is the gift of Himself, the Father, and Holy Spirit dwelling within us. How does this inheritance affect our lives? The more we “use” our inheritance from Jesus, the more we recognize the gift of peace that He also promises in today’s Gospel: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you.” This is the peace we long for as individuals, families, communities, nations, and worldwide. Human efforts have helped us to defeat the countless powers that seek to separate us from God and one another (just ask a faith-filled veteran). Yet still, in all too many places around the world, there is violence, injustice, destruction and the abuse and taking of human life.

So, what is this peace Jesus is leaving us? It is the peace that comes from truly believing that He knows us as we are at each moment of our lives and is with us in all we say, do and think each day. This thought is expressed so clearly at the beginning of each of the four Eucharistic Prayers (for Various Occasions): “You are indeed Holy and to be glorified, O God, Who love the human race and Who always walk with us on the journey of life. Blessed indeed is Your Son, present in our midst when we are gathered by His Love, and when, as once for the disciples, so now for us, He opens the Scriptures and breaks the bread.” Obviously we need to accept His invitation to be renewed by our inheritance from Him through our heartfelt participation in the Mass every week. Jesus never tires of inviting us to open our eyes to His Love for us and His Presence to us. It is Jesus and our inheritance from Him, which is Jesus Himself, that lifts us beyond the confusion, challenges, and obstacles we face as individuals, families, communities, and nations. Only a nation under God can be one nation. It takes God to not only take away the confusion…but also to enlighten us with the truth of who we truly are and what we are ultimately capable of in the best sense possible.

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 28, 2017

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Those who are an intimate part of our lives dwell in our minds and hearts. They color the way we live our lives every day. When they are sick and suffering they are in the forefront of our thoughts and concerns. Their burdens become our burden. When they are celebrating achievements or special events, we are joyful with them and for them. When they are confused we look to help work out their problems and concerns and at the same time assure them of our love. It is exactly this kind of presence that Jesus promises to us in today’s Gospel when He promises to bring the Father and dwell within us. Are we aware of this presence? Do we want this presence? 

During the Easter Season almost every day the first reading at Mass has been from the Acts of the Apostles. This book of the Bible is the account of the first generation of the Church after Jesus rose and ascended into heaven. They faced many challenges among themselves and from outside forces. What is very clear as we read from the Acts of the Apostles is that all who came to believe in Jesus knew that He was dwelling within them and they were dwelling within Him. One very clear example is from Acts 5:17-29: 

“Then the high priest rose up and all his companions, that is, the party of the Sadducees, and, filled with jealousy, laid hands upon the apostles and put them in the public jail. But during the night, the angel of the Lord opened the doors of the prison, led them out, and said, ‘Go and take your place in the temple area, and tell the people everything about this life.’ When they heard this, they went to the temple early in the morning and taught. When the high priest and his companions arrived, they convened the Sanhedrin, the full senate of the Israelites, and sent to the jail to have them brought in. But the court officers who went did not find them in the prison, so they came back and reported, ‘We found the jail securely locked and the guards stationed outside the doors, but when we opened them, we found no one inside.’ When they heard this report, the captain of the temple guard and the chief priests were at a loss about them, as to what this would come to. Then someone came in and reported to them, ‘The men whom you put in prison are in the temple area and are teaching the people.’ Then the captain and the court officers went and brought them in, but without force, because they were afraid of being stoned by the people. When they had brought them in and made them stand before the Sanhedrin, the high priest questioned them, ‘We gave you strict orders [did we not?] to stop teaching in that name. Yet you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching and want to bring this man’s blood upon us.’ But Peter and the apostles said in reply, ‘We must obey God rather than men.’ 

With a little time, the Apostles (and us) can finally figured it out…the need for God in our lives. And, not a god we make up out of our own minds…but…God, Who wants us to have a real…intimate…actual relationship with us (but on His terms…not ours). Our challenge as American Catholics is not to be so influenced by the media, political candidates, and political parties…but to allow the vision of Jesus who dwells within us to illumine the way to the truth for ourselves and for our nation. Our society over and over again dismisses God and sound moral doctrine in the name of convenience and freedom. To be part of that mind set is to walk down the path with your head looking straight up and not where your feet are going. Of course any path like this leads to confusion and destruction (and misleads our young people about what it means to dwell in: Jesus…the Father…or to recognize Jesus and the Father dwelling in us). Take a hint from the Gospel and the angel in Acts this week: “Why are you standing there looking at the sky?” Get busy as Jesus told you: “All power in heaven and on earth has been given to Me. Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

Father Kevin’s Reflection – May 21, 2017

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Last week we celebrated Mother’s Day. As we honored one parent lst week, Jesus honors His Father this week. In today’s Gospel Jesus speaks about how He is going to glorify God. That glorification is seen in how He suffered the injustice of crucifixion, but rose from the dead and beyond all who tried to silence Him. He spoke (and taught) something that in the 21st century…is absolutely, politically incorrect. Saying – do what I tell you and you will be assured of being correct, and you will find an eternity of happiness. He said: “I am the way the truth and the life”. Well…who does Jesus think He is? After all…is Pontius Pilate more the model of the 21st century…when – looking at Jesus…do we say: “What is truth?” In looking at what is going on in our nation at this point and all the debates about different issues, respect for life must be at the forefront. Whenever we compromise or deny the truth, the seeds of destruction and disunity are planted. We who have the treasure of faith are not obliged to convert those who are not in agreement with us…but we are challenged to speak up for the truth about human life. There is no candidate that is perfect on this issue as far as action is concerned. Some Catholic politicians at least pay lip service…while others are clearly supportive of abortion.  I am not a one issue person, but when a basic issue is ignored there will never be peace in our hearts, our nation, and in our world. To look past the issue of abortion is to allow evil to continue to destroy children in the womb and scar the hearts, minds, and souls of all those involved. How could the German people stand by and allow 12 million people to perish in the concentration camps? How can we continue to stand by as almost 60 million children have been aborted since this practice was legalized on January 22, 1973? Evil has wreaked havoc for the past 43 years. How much longer will it prosper? Who will speak up? Politicians promise jobs, reform, lower taxes, refugee programs, and the defeat of ISIS and other evils. (They speak as if they are an omnipotent God.) But wherever innocent life is attacked or threatened and nothing is done, our national spirit deteriorates.

We are grateful to all veterans who have sacrificed their time and even their lives to defend who we are as Americans. Easter time energizes us to muster the courage to look at what is most important to our nation.   When we glorify God by our lives as Jesus did, our national health and moral fiber are strengthened.

The Resurrection of Jesus has many aspects. One of them is rising above our fears, hesitancy, lethargy, apathy, and ignorance to live and speak the truth about human life. Life is a gift from God. You who are parents have blessed your children in the God-like way you created them and continue to love and nurture them.  You are more fully alive with them than you would have been without them.

As Jesus is the Way, the Truth and the life…let us say:  Thank you Father for the gift of life. Thank you for the gift of your Son Jesus. May my gratitude inspire and sustain me in doing everything I can to respect all people and to do all in my power to end abortion and everything else that harms, abuses, or threatens human life. Give me the courage and strength to live in your image each day.

Henri Nouwen said: “Prayer is the way to both the heart of God and the heart of the world.”How blessed, challenged, grateful, and humbled we are to live in God’s world.